Woodland Indian Hamlet

The Woodland Indian Hamlet at Historic St. Mary’s City is a re-creation of a small village typical of those found in the southern Maryland area in 1634. Here visitors learn about Native American society, culture, and lifeways. Learn how the Yaocomaco , Piscataway and other tribes around the Chesapeake Bay lived, interacted with each other, and how their lives were drastically altered by the arrival of the Maryland Colonists.

Click above to watch Amanda Brown explain who was living in the MD area when colonists arrived, ​and how they interacted with European colonists (MPT Series "The Dig" will open in a new window).

VISITOR EXHIBITS

Life in the Village

VISITOR EXHIBITS

See the Grounds

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Amanda Brown explains who was in the MD area when colonists arrived, and how they interacted with European colonists (MPT Series will open in a new window).

Activities and Lessons

Lectures

"Arise Nannsonan: Restoring the Indigenous Feminine". On April 5, 1707, seven Chaptico Indians applied for justice on behalf of their chief. That chief was a woman, recorded briefly in the Maryland Archives as Queen Nannsonan. She sought the return of items stolen from her daughter's tomb. Piscataway women at that time were on the brink of losing their traditional political, social, and economic powers to a hegemonic colonial system. Centuries later, Native women raise re-connections to these feminine traditions, roles, and the safeguarding of Mother Earth herself. Like indigenous women across the country, they are calling for "Rematriation."

Gallery